C4C Pantry Program

May 2020

Burnie’s Communities for Children (C4C) has switched several of its funded programs to online, and we’re finding this is a great way to do things – especially when people are staying home. CatholicCare is the facilitating partner for C4C in North West Tasmania, and this region has been under a high level of lockdown in response to the COVID-19 circumstances. But that hasn’t stopped us getting our engaging and educational programs out to our participants.

“Our delivery partners can’t do things face-to-face or hold groups like playgroups while we are socially distancing, so they have scaled back a bit,” said C4C Coordinator Mary Yaxley, “but we have worked closely with our delivery partners to put some of our programs online so people can participate from home. It’s going well!”

For the families in My Family Food Pantry – a social educational program that builds health and food literacy in families experiencing disadvantage – it means the participants can stay home but still join in the cooking classes and chat with us and with each other during the workshop in a chat platform from their kitchens.

“C4C’s delivery partner, Burnie Community House, is videoing their family meal cooking classes and the families watch from home on a dedicated YouTube channel. They get to join in with the recipes and the weekly learning packs which include food, recipes and other resources are delivered to their homes - non-contact, of course.

“It’s a complete change, but we’ve found that our participants have incorporated it into their family routine, and some have made it part of their learning-from-home component with the kids,” Mary said.

“I love it”, “Looking forward to whatever this week has in store. Going to try to get my eldest to do more measuring and such” and “The kids and I had a great time” were among the great comments from the program’s families after moving it online.

“It means that the delivery partners for the program can still keep in touch with the families regularly, and by using Zoom they are able to continue to provide support and hook people up to any services they may require. So, participants in the program are still getting support, even though the delivery partner can’t physically take people to services,” said Mary.

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C4C Pantry Program

Posted in News & Media

Burnie’s Communities for Children (C4C) has switched several of its funded programs to online, and we’re finding this is a great way to do things – especially when people are staying home. CatholicCare is the facilitating partner for C4C in North West Tasmania, and this region has been under a high level of lockdown in response to the COVID-19 circumstances. But that hasn’t stopped us getting our engaging and educational programs out to our participants.

“Our delivery partners can’t do things face-to-face or hold groups like playgroups while we are socially distancing, so they have scaled back a bit,” said C4C Coordinator Mary Yaxley, “but we have worked closely with our delivery partners to put some of our programs online so people can participate from home. It’s going well!”

For the families in My Family Food Pantry – a social educational program that builds health and food literacy in families experiencing disadvantage – it means the participants can stay home but still join in the cooking classes and chat with us and with each other during the workshop in a chat platform from their kitchens.

“C4C’s delivery partner, Burnie Community House, is videoing their family meal cooking classes and the families watch from home on a dedicated YouTube channel. They get to join in with the recipes and the weekly learning packs which include food, recipes and other resources are delivered to their homes - non-contact, of course.

“It’s a complete change, but we’ve found that our participants have incorporated it into their family routine, and some have made it part of their learning-from-home component with the kids,” Mary said.

“I love it”, “Looking forward to whatever this week has in store. Going to try to get my eldest to do more measuring and such” and “The kids and I had a great time” were among the great comments from the program’s families after moving it online.

“It means that the delivery partners for the program can still keep in touch with the families regularly, and by using Zoom they are able to continue to provide support and hook people up to any services they may require. So, participants in the program are still getting support, even though the delivery partner can’t physically take people to services,” said Mary.